bid_ce_workshop_1_case_2_dataset_3

Latest version published by Test Organization #1 on May 16, 2019 Test Organization #1

The International Butterfly Amateur Network (IBAN) has been providing a framework for national amateur observational groups to capture data about the occurrence of butterflies (Lepidoptera) since 2009. An extensive network of amateur observers use a standard protocol based on Pollard walks to capture this information on paper sheets that they send 1 to their national office. Some of these offices digitize this information into spreadsheets, but others do not have the human resources to do this and they send the paper logs to the IBAN for processing. IBAN produces an annual report based on the sightings provided by these national members, with updated distribution maps and analysis of population trends for some key species.

Data Records

The data in this sampling event resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 39 records. 2 extension data tables also exist. An extension record supplies extra information about a core record. The number of records in each extension data table is illustrated below.

  • Event (core)
    39
  • ExtendedMeasurementOrFact 
    39
  • Occurrence 
    39

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Downloads

Download the latest version of this resource data as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) or the resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Data as a DwC-A file download 39 records in English (6 KB) - Update frequency: unknown
Metadata as an EML file download in English (7 KB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in English (8 KB)

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is Test Organization #1. To the extent possible under law, the publisher has waived all rights to these data and has dedicated them to the Public Domain (CC0 1.0). Users may copy, modify, distribute and use the work, including for commercial purposes, without restriction.

GBIF Registration

This resource has not been registered with GBIF

Keywords

Samplingevent

Contacts

Who created the resource:

IBAN IBAN
Curator
IBAN

Who can answer questions about the resource:

IBAN IBAN
Curator
IBAN

Who filled in the metadata:

Blaise Binama
Researcher affiliate
CoEB KG375st 000 Kigali Rwanda RW +250783566976

Who else was associated with the resource:

User
Temporary Test User

Geographic Coverage

Data from Israel

Bounding Coordinates South West [-90, -180], North East [90, -180]

Sampling Methods

The recommended protocol —Pollard walks— is based on transects that range between 300 and 600 m in length, divided into 50 m sections. Each transect should cover a single habitat type. In each visit, transect­walkers have to count all species of lepidoptera that can be seen within 5 m of the transect line. Special behaviours (egg laying or nectaring), as well as developmental stage (e.g., larvae or eggs), should be recorded as well. There are quality control measures in place: every reported record is flagged "Pending approval". Record status is only changed to "Approved" after verification by a designated taxonomic expert. Species spotted out of their regular season or distribution area are flagged for additional verification. Time of day and weather conditions are recorded at the beginning of the transect. Along the transect, the number of individuals of every species seen is counted. Un­identified species are counted and recorded either by family or as a predefined complex of two or three similar species. Butterflies seen outside the 5 meter range are recorded as “Extra+the number of the nearest section” (e.g. 5­-extra). The end time of the transect is also recorded.

Study Extent For most countries, these sampling efforts happen once every two weeks from the beginning of October to the end of June.

Method step description:

  1. The recommended protocol —Pollard walks— is based on transects that range between 300 and 600 m in length, divided into 50 m sections. Each transect should cover a single habitat type. In each visit, transect­walkers have to count all species of lepidoptera that can be seen within 5 m of the transect line. Special behaviours (egg laying or nectaring), as well as developmental stage (e.g., larvae or eggs), should be recorded as well. There are quality control measures in place: every reported record is flagged "Pending approval". Record status is only changed to "Approved" after verification by a designated taxonomic expert. Species spotted out of their regular season or distribution area are flagged for additional verification. Time of day and weather conditions are recorded at the beginning of the transect. Along the transect, the number of individuals of every species seen is counted. Un­identified species are counted and recorded either by family or as a predefined complex of two or three similar species. Butterflies seen outside the 5 meter range are recorded as “Extra+the number of the nearest section” (e.g. 5­-extra). The end time of the transect is also recorded.

Additional Metadata

Alternative Identifiers https://ipt.gbif.org/resource?r=bid_ce_workshop_1_case_2_dataset_3