• IPT startup warnings. For additional help diagnosing the problem(s), please see logs. After fixing the problem(s), please restart your web server.
  • Extension /mnt/auto/iptdata/ipt-data/config/.extensions/http_rs_gbif_org_terms_1_0_DNADerivedData.xml has been deleted from the IPT data directory because it was invalid or out-of-date. Please install the latest version of this extension if needed and restart your web server. Cause: Can't parse local extension file: Error at line 138 char 27: An error occurred while trying to install vocabulary https://rs.gbif.org/sandbox/vocabulary/mixs/biotic_relationship.xml.

biotime516_bath_communities_Brazil

Latest version published by Test Organization #1 on Dec 11, 2020 Test Organization #1

Bats have been surveyed in 39 sites, comprising continuous forest (CF), fragments, forest edges and intervening secondary regrowth. For each site, the authors assessed vegetation structure (local-scale variable) and, for five focal scales, quantified habitat amount and four landscape configuration metrics. Each sampling site was visited eight times over a 2-year period, between August 2011 and June 2013. Bats were captured using 14 ground-level mist nets (12 9 2.5 m, 16 mm mesh, ECOTONE, Poland) in CF and fragment interiors, and seven ground-level mist nets at the edge and matrix sites. Mist nets were deployed along existing trails which are known to be used by Neotropical bats as commuting flyways. At edge sites, these trails ran parallel to the border between primary forest and secondary regrowth. In the study area mist netting efficiency was found to be highest in the first few hours after sunset. Sampling therefore started at dusk and was performed for 6 h during which nets were visited at intervals of ~20 min. Mist netting at the same location for consecutive days can lead to diminishing capture efficiency over time. Such net-shyness related bias was avoided by spacing visits to the same site 3-4 weeks apart. Species were identified following Gardner (2007) and Lim and Engstrom (2010), and taxonomy follows Gardner (2007). Most adult bats were marked with individually numbered ball-chain necklaces (frugivores and Pteronotus parnellii) or subcutaneous transponders (gleaning animalivores). For further detail please see associated papers.

Data Records

The data in this sampling event resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 225 records. 1 extension data tables also exist. An extension record supplies extra information about a core record. The number of records in each extension data table is illustrated below.

  • Event (core)
    225
  • Occurrence 
    1380

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Downloads

Download the latest version of this resource data as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) or the resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Data as a DwC-A file download 225 records in English (32 KB) - Update frequency: not planned
Metadata as an EML file download in English (10 KB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in English (11 KB)

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

How to cite

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Rocha, R. (2017) Tropical forest fragmentation: effects on the spatio-temporal dynamics of its bat communities. PhD Thesis, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is Test Organization #1. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 License.

GBIF Registration

This resource has been registered with GBIF, and assigned the following GBIF UUID: 2b8fd327-844c-4635-ace8-e9b950686443.  Test Organization #1 publishes this resource, and is itself registered in GBIF as a data publisher endorsed by GBIF Secretariat.

Keywords

Samplingevent; bats; forest; chiroptera

Contacts

Who created the resource:

Viviana Brambilla
BioTIME database manager
University of St Andrews GB

Who can answer questions about the resource:

Viviana Brambilla
BioTIME database manager
University of St Andrews GB

Who filled in the metadata:

Viviana Brambilla
BioTIME database manager
University of St Andrews GB

Who else was associated with the resource:

User
Viviana Brambilla

Geographic Coverage

Bats communities among fragmented forests were studied in Central Amazonia (Brazil).

Bounding Coordinates South West [-2.448, -60.113], North East [-2.337, -59.758]

Taxonomic Coverage

Bats communities in Brazilian forests. Species were identified following Gardner (2007) and Lim and Engstrom (2010), and taxonomy follows Gardner (2007). For further detail please see associated papers.

Order  Chiroptera

Temporal Coverage

Start Date / End Date 1997-01-23 / 2013-05-23

Project Data

No Description available

Title BioTIME - study 516
Study Area Description Bats have been surveyed in 39 sites, comprising continuous forest (CF), fragments, forest edges and intervening secondary regrowth.

The personnel involved in the project:

Ricardo Rocha

Sampling Methods

For each site, vegetation structure and bat assemblages were sampled. Bats were captured using 14 ground-level mist nets (12 9 2.5 m, 16 mm mesh, ECOTONE, Poland) in CF and fragment interiors, and seven ground-level mist nets at the edge and matrix sites. Mist nets were deployed along existing trails which are known to be used by Neotropical bats as commuting flyways (Palmeirim and Etheridge 1985). At edge sites, these trails ran parallel to the border between primary forest and secondary regrowth. Sampling started at dusk and was performed for 6 h during which nets were visited at intervals of*20 min. Visits were spaced 3-4 weeks apart. Species were identified following Gardner (2007) and Lim and Engstrom (2010), and taxonomy follows Gardner (2007). Most adult bats were marked with individually numbered ball-chain necklaces (frugivores and Pteronotus parnellii) or subcutaneous transponders (gleaning animalivores).

Study Extent Bats were surveyed in 39 sites within Central Amazonia, comprising continuous forest (CF), fragments, forest edges and intervening secondary regrowth.

Method step description:

  1. Copy-paste from the studies.

Bibliographic Citations

  1. Rocha, R., López-Baucells, A., Farneda, F.Z., Groenenberg, M., Bobrowiec, P.E.D., Cabeza, M., Palmeirim, J.M. & Meyer, C.F.J. (2017) Consequences of a large-scale fragmentation experiment for Neotropical bats: disentangling the relative importance of local and landscape-scale effects. Landscape Ecology, 32, 31-45. 10.1007/s10980-016-0425-3
  2. Sampaio, E.M., Kalko, E.K., Bernard, E., Rodríguez-Herrera, B. & Handley, C.O. (2003) A biodiversity assessment of bats (Chiroptera) in a tropical lowland rainforest of Central Amazonia, including methodological and conservation considerations. Studies on Neotropical fauna and environment, 38, 17-31. 10.1076/snfe.38.1.17.14035
  3. Rocha, R., Ovaskainen, O., López-Baucells, A., Farneda, F.Z., Sampaio, E.M., Bobrowiec, P.E.D., Cabeza, M., Palmeirim, J.M. & Meyer, C.F.J. (2018) Secondary forest regeneration benefits old-growth specialist bats in a fragmented tropical landscape. Scientific Reports, 8, 3819 10.1038/s41598-018-21999-2
  4. Farneda, F.Z., Rocha, R., López-Baucells, A., Sampaio, E.M., Palmeirim, J.M., Bobrowiec, P.E., Grelle, C.E. & Meyer, C.F. (2018) Functional recovery of Amazonian bat assemblages following secondary forest succession. Biological Conservation, 218, 192-199. 10.1177/1940082918777185

Additional Metadata

Alternative Identifiers https://ipt.gbif.org/resource?r=biotime516_test